Tag Archive london

New breast cancer test links immune ‘hotspots’ to better survival

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Researchers used statistical software previously used in criminology studies of crime hotspots to track the extent to which the immune system was homing in and attacking breast cancer cells. The test, described in the journal Modern Pathology, could assess whether a woman’s immune system is holding a cancer at bay — and pick out those who will need intensive treatment to combat their more aggressive disease. Scientists at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, analysed tumour samples from 245 women with a type of breast cancer called oestrogen receptor negative (ER negative), which is particularly hard to treat. …

Women back idea of more breast screens for those at high risk of cancer

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Fewer women (60 per cent) would be happy to be screened less often if they were found to be at lower risk. More than 940 women from across the UK were asked for their views on the possibility of tailoring breast screening to people’s genetic risk in a study funded by Cancer Research UK and The Eve Appeal…

Cancer fear can impact screening uptake

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The study, published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, looked at how different types of fear influenced colorectal cancer screening decisions in nearly eight thousand UK adults. Different experiences of fear were found to have different effects on people’s likeliness to get tested…

Tamoxifen reduces breast cancer rates by nearly a third for 20 years

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The IBIS-I trial (International Breast Cancer Intervention Study), led by Queen Mary University of London and funded by Cancer Research UK, examined the long-term risks and benefits of taking tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer in women at high risk of the disease (aged 35-70 years old, primarily with a family history of breast cancer). During the study 7,154 pre and post-menopausal women were randomized to receive either tamoxifen (20mg daily) or a matching placebo for five years. …

Zinc test could help diagnose breast cancer early — ScienceDaily

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In a world-first the researchers were able to show that changes in the isotopic composition of zinc, which can be detected in a person’s breast tissue, could make it possible to identify a ‘biomarker’ (a measurable indicator) of early breast cancer. A report of the research by the Oxford University-led team, which included researchers from Imperial College London and the Natural History Museum, London, is published in the Royal Society of Chemistry journal Metallomics. The pilot study analysed zinc in the blood and blood serum of ten subjects (five breast cancer patients and five healthy controls) alongside a range of breast tissue samples from breast cancer patients. By using techniques that are over 100 times more sensitive to changes in the isotopic composition of metals than anything currently used by clinicians, the researchers were able to show that they could detect key differences in zinc caused when cancer subtly alters the way that cells process the metal…

Substantial improvement in England, Wales cancer survival over 40 years overshadowed by low survival for brain, stomach, lung, oesophageal, and…

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Led by the Cancer Research UK Cancer Survival Group at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK, the researchers analysed survival trends for more than 7 million adults (aged 15 to 99 years) diagnosed with one of 21 common cancers in England and Wales between 1971 and 2011, and followed up to the end of 2012. The 21 cancers clearly divided into three groups with either high, moderate, or low survival…

Cheap malaria drug could treat colorectal cancer effectively too, say experts

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A pilot study by researchers at St George’s, University of London, has found the drug artesunate, which is a widely used anti-malaria medicine, had a promising effect on reducing the multiplication of tumour cells in colorectal cancer patients who were already going to have their cancer surgically removed. Colorectal cancer (CRC) makes up about 10 percent of the annual 746,000 global cancer cases in men and 614,000 cases in women. …

Cannabis extract can have dramatic effect on brain cancer, says new research

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The new research by specialists at St George’s, University of London, studied the treatment of brain cancer tumours in the laboratory and discovered that the most effective treatment was to combine active chemical components of the cannabis plant which are called cannabinoids. Two of these called tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) were tested as part of the research into brain cancer which is particularly difficult to treat and claims the lives of about 5,200 each year. …

Patients with emergency-diagnosed lung cancer report barriers to seeing their GP

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The study, carried out by researchers from the London Cancer Alliance (LCA) and King’s College London investigated around 130 patients who were diagnosed with lung cancer after attending as an emergency at one of seven hospitals in south and west London. Overall, nearly half of the patients reported that something had put them off going to the doctor, including difficulty making an appointment, not being able to see their usual doctor, not having confidence in the GP, and fear of what the doctor might find. About a fifth of all patients (18 per cent) said they had not realised that their symptoms were serious.A fifth of all patients — who tended to be older, poorer and more fearful of what the doctor might find — delayed going to their doctor with their symptoms for more than 12 weeks. Three-quarters of the patients had consulted their GP about their symptoms, and one fifth had seen a GP at least three times. …

Ethnic minorities less aware of cancer symptoms, more likely to identify barriers to seeking medical help

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Researchers looked at nearly 50,000 responses to the Cancer Research UK Cancer Awareness Measure from people across England. They found that ethnic minority groups were consistently less aware of cancer symptoms. People with a black ethnic background were half as likely as white people to recognise that unexplained bleeding could be a symptom of cancer; while South Asians were a quarter as likely as white people to recognise that an unexplained lump or swelling could be a cancer symptom…