Tag Archive researchers

Tailor-made cancer treatments? New cell culture technique paves the way

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The new technique is more than three times as effective as previous methods. Researchers say it’s a major step forward in the study of circulating tumor cells, which are shed from tumors and circulate through the blood of cancer patients. They’re believed to cause metastasis, the spread of cancer through the body that’s responsible for nearly 90 percent of cancer-related deaths. The cells also hold valuable genetic information that could lead doctors to more informed treatment decisions and even tailor-made therapies for individual patients…

Combining images, genetic data proves gene loss behind aggressive ovarian cancers

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In a revolutionary approach the researchers from the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute made the discovery by combining images from cancer samples with genetic data. …

Early adoption of robotic surgery leads to organ preservation for kidney cancer patients

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Researchers from NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere, publishing online December 11 in the journal Medical Care, report that by 2008, hospitals that had adopted robotic surgery at the start of the current century (between 2001 and 2004) performed partial nephrectomies in 38% of kidney cancer cases compared to late adopters (2005 to 2008) who performed partial nephrectomies only 24% of the time. Partial nephrectomy, the removal of a section of the kidney as opposed to the removal of the entire organ, is preferred over total nephrectomy because it can achieve similar outcomes in cancer while avoiding the long-term risks associated with total kidney removal, such as cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney failure and premature death…

Early trial of new drug shows promise for patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer — ScienceDaily

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The multi-center, non-randomized trial was designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability and antitumor activity of bi-weekly infusions of pembrolizumab (MK-3475, marketed as Keytruda�). The researchers enrolled 27 patients, aged 29 to 72 years, who had metastatic triple-negative breast cancer that either relapsed after treatment for early stage disease or progressed on therapy for advanced disease…

Immune function marker does not predict benefit of trastuzumab in HER-2+ breast cancer patients

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And since trastuzumab, and not chemotherapy alone, is the standard of care for the HER2-positive sub-class of breast cancer, there is no need to test for these lymphocytes in HER2-positive patients in order to predict outcome, say researchers from Mayo Clinic in Florida. These findings, presented at the 2014 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, don’t mean that immune function in this class of cancer isn’t important — just that it is likely more complicated than measuring the number of these lymphocytes, says the study’s lead author, Edith A. Perez, M.D., deputy director at large, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, and director of the Breast Cancer Translational Genomics Program at Mayo Clinic in Florida. “Researchers are really interested in the different components of the immune system as a predictor of the natural history of breast cancer and benefit from different therapies, but it may be that when trastuzumab is used, it is the function of the immune system and not the number of lymphocytes that is important,” Dr. …

Targeting microRNA may benefit some ovarian and breast cancer patients — ScienceDaily

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Researchers behind a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center believe they may have found a molecule-based approach to halting 3q26.2’s destructive nature. …

Targeting microRNA may benefit some ovarian and breast cancer patients

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Researchers behind a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center believe they may have found a molecule-based approach to halting 3q26.2’s destructive nature. By manipulating a non-coding microRNA (miRNA) known as miR569 that is part of the amplicon, scientists were able to increase cell death in vitro and in vivo…

Protein that controls the ‘guardian of the genome’ identified

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The researchers study the development of T cells and B cells, which are lymphocytes (or immune cells) that play a central role in protecting our body against infections by viruses, bacteria and other microbial agents. “As these lymphocytes develop, they must learn how to recognize different pathogens in the body,” says Dr. M�r�y, Director of the Hematopoiesis and Cancer research unit at the IRCM. “Part of this process involves the breaking and rearranging of the genes responsible for producing the lymphocyte receptors that recognize these pathogens…

Smoking and higher mortality in men

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Smoking is a risk factor for various diseases, not only lung cancer. Epidemiological data show that male smokers have a greater risk of developing cancer outside the respiratory tract than female smokers. In the present study, which is the result of an international collaboration, the researchers discovered an association between smoking and genetic damage among men that might explain this sex difference. ‘We have previously in 2014 demonstrated an association between loss of the Y chromosome in blood and greater risk for cancer…

Britain’s obese in denial about their weight

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In one of the first studies of its kind to examine British perceptions of obesity, fewer than 10 per cent of those who are clinically obese accept they have a serious weight problem. In a 2012 survey of around 2000 adults, only 11 per cent of obese women accurately acknowledged they were “obese,” with most describing themselves as “very overweight” or “just right.” And among men, only seven per cent correctly described themselves as being “obese” and another 16 per cent as “very overweight.” Approximately 10 per cent of people in the survey knew the BMI threshold for obesity and those who did were more likely to define themselves as “obese.” Researchers suggest that as bigger sizes become the new “normal,” people are less likely to recognise the health problems associated with their weight. Professor Jane Wardle, co-author and director of the Cancer Research UK Health Behaviour Centre at UCL, said: “It’s a real worry that people don’t recognise that their weight places them in the obese category, because it means they aren’t aware they are at increased risk of a number of health problems including cancer. …